14 to 20 April 2013

The round up for 14 to 20 April.  Though those days don’t have any beatifications, it is worth noting Sunday 21 April will have one.

Sunday 14 April in 1936 in New York, the repose of the Servant of God James Anthony Walsh.  A priest from Massachusetts, he co-founded the Maryknoll Missionaries.  The diocesean portion of his cause was opened about a year and a half ago, and is still in the early stages.

Also 14 April, in 2006 in Buffalo, the martyrdom of Karen Klimczak.  A nun with the Sisters of Saint Joseph, she was involved with prison ministry and the attempt to reintegrate former convicts into outside life.  She was killed by one of the people she was trying to help.  I am not aware of a cause for her canonization.

Also 14 April, the death in 2007 of Audrey Santo.  A problematic case, there are those who believe her to have been a victim soul suffering on behalf of others for the years she was in what appeared to be a coma.  There is movement to have her proclaimed a saint, but it is as yet in very preliminary stages and doesn’t seem to be recognized by the Church.

Monday 15 April in 1893 in Leon, Spain, the repose of the Servant of God Maria Adelaida of Saint Teresa.  Born Joan Adelaide O’Sullivan in New York, she was a Discalced Carmelite.  When she died, she was living in one of the Spanish houses.  The diocesean phase of her cause closed in 1984.

Tuesday 16 April in San Juan in 1966, the repose of the Servant of God Ninfas Victorino.  Born Augustin Arnaud Pages in France, he was a brother with the De La Salle Brothers teaching in Puerto Rico, where he is remembered as a particularly holy man.  His cause has been in Rome since 2005.

Wednesday 17 April in 1940 in Chicago, the repose of the Venerable Servant of God Mother Maria.  Born Kasimira Kaupas in Lithuania, she was a nun and foundress of the Sisters of Saint Casimir.  She was declared Venerable in 2010.

Thursday 18 April in 1879 in St Leonards-on-the-Sea, England, the repose of the Venerable Servant of God Cornelia Connelly.  A rather tragic case of a mother who converted to the Church with her husband, but when he returned to Protestantism the combination of anti-Catholic bigotry and patriarchal law estranged her from most of her children, though the death of her two year old was even more tragic.  She founded the order of the Sisters of the Holy Child Jesus, active today in fourteen countries, and was declared Venerable in 1992.

Also Thursday 18 April in Rockdale, Texas, in 1721, the martyrdom of Jose Pita.  A Franciscan brother, he was killed by Apaches.  Whether he was truly a martyr is questioned, as he may not have been killed specifically for being Catholic.  I am not aware of a cause for his canonization.

Friday 19 April in Pecos, New Mexico, in 1542, the memory of the martyrdom of Luis Descalona de Ubeda.  (The precise date is uncertain.)  One of the Protomartyrs of New Mexico, he was a Franciscan brother who accompanied Juan de Padilla, staying in New Mexico to serve among the native peoples.  I am not aware of a cause for his canonization.

Saturday 20 April, in Wisconsin in 1687, the martyrdom of Louis le Boesme.  A Jesuit priest, he was martyred by the Winnebagoes.  I am not aware of a cause for his canonization.

Finally, also 20 April, among the Orthodox, the translation of the relics of S Nikolai Velimirovic, which is also his main feast.  Bishop of Ohrid, he was a refugee in America from 1946 to 1956, which is why his body was in Pennsylvania until it could be repatriated. He was glorified by the Serbian church in 2003.  (I’m not sure if 20 April is the date in New Style or Old Style, but whichever equates to 3 May.)

All the saints, ora pro nobis.

All the martyrs, ora pro nobis.

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3 Responses to 14 to 20 April 2013

  1. V.E.G. says:

    By the way, the longest coma is known history was Edwarda O’Bara, a woman of Polish origin. The second longest coma in known history was Elaine Esposito. Ironically, two days after Edwarda died, the woman was named Elaine Haltek went Home to be with the Lord, and she is from Chicago.

  2. V.E.G. says:

    Audrey Santo died 142 years to the day Abraham Lincoln was shot in the head.

  3. V.E.G. says:

    Clarification:
    By the way, the longest coma is known history was Edwarda O’Bara, a woman of Polish origin. The second longest coma in known history was Elaine Esposito. Ironically, two days after Edwarda died, the woman was named Elaine Haltek has the same first name was the woman with the second longest coma in known history, went Home to be with the Lord, and she is from Chicago.

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